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Heat Stroke in Hot Roman Summer

How To Avoid Heat Stroke This Summer In Rome

When does "hot" become "too hot"? How to deal with the extremely hot summer in Rome and stay healthy while wearing out your shoes around the city. Stay cool and stay safe when visiting the eternal city.

It is no mystery that it is hot outside, with this brutal and seemingly relentless weather. I know you’ve noticed, you’ve all been talking about it lately. With this extremely hot weather of the last several weeks, people need to be taking extra precautions when they venture outside. Heat stroke is a very real and dangerous condition that can develop when temperatures begin soaring into the high digits that they have been lately.

Caused when a person’s body temperature gets too hot, heat stroke sets in when one does not stay properly hydrated in hot and humid climates. A heat stroke is a medical emergency and needs to be treated immediately. Some of the common symptoms that are associated with heat stroke are an increased body temperature, confusion, passing out, difficulty walking, seizures or hallucinations. Heat stroke can also produce symptoms such as muscles cramps, headaches and vomiting. These symptoms are common also in case of heat cramps and heat exhaustion. However, developing either of these conditions can lead to heat stroke. If any of these symptoms occur, seek medical attention immediately. Luckily, there are many medical options with English speaking doctors in and around the heart of Rome, convenient for tourists who are out sightseeing.

Whether you are out shopping on Via del Corso or sitting in the sun on the Spanish Steps, with heat this wicked, it wouldn’t hurt to check where the nearest medical facilities are located before heading out. Unless you are living la Dolce Vita, jumping in the Trevi Fountain is not an option, I bet you prefer to visit a doctor’s office rather than a jail!

Other precautions that you can take to avoid becoming a victim to the heat include drinking plenty of fluids. Avoid drinks with alcohol and caffeine. Wear light, loose-fitting clothing. Avoid excessive exercise and take multiple breaks in an air conditioned car or building. If you must exercise, do so in the early morning before the temperature is at its highest. Try to stay cool and enjoy the summer the best you can!
For more information see the CDC heat emergency page .

A heat stroke is a medical emergency and needs to be treated immediately. Some of the common symptoms that are associated with heat stroke are an increased body temperature, confusion, passing out, difficulty walking, seizures or hallucinations. Heat stroke can also produce symptoms such as muscles cramps, headaches and vomiting.